The Latest: California counties sue over lead paint measure

Tuesday June 26, 2018 07:55 PM

The Latest: California counties sue over lead paint measure

Santa Clara County and San Francisco are suing to block an initiative to limit liability for lead paint companies from going before California voters in November

Written by The Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on a California ballot measure related to lead paint (all times local):

4:30 p.m.

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Santa Clara County and San Francisco are suing to block an initiative to limit liability for lead paint companies from going before California voters in November.

The jurisdictions filed a lawsuit Tuesday in the California Supreme Court. Earlier in the day, the California Secretary of State announced supporters of the measure had collected enough signatures to qualify for the ballot.

Santa Clara and San Francisco are among the communities that sued paint companies over the health dangers posed by lead paint. Courts ruled that lead paint is a public nuisance and required the paint companies to pay for cleanup.

The initiative in question was financed by the paint companies and would shift the cleanup costs to California taxpayers. Santa Clara and San Francisco say the measure seeks to mislead voters.

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1:20 p.m.

California voters can expect to see an initiative to limit liability for lead paint companies on their November ballots.

The California Secretary of State announced Tuesday that the measure had collected enough signatures to make the ballot. It would authorize bond funding to clean up lead paint in California buildings. It's funded by paint companies who will otherwise have to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to clean up lead paint themselves in 10 California cities and counties that sued them.

The paint companies financed the initiative after court rulings declared lead paint to be a public nuisance and required companies to pay for cleanup.

The measure would shift the cost from the paint companies to California taxpayers. The initiative backers argue it would be good for California residents.